Photo : ©Mikio Koyama / RendezVous


2018/11/05  #024

SNS Eigojutsu (on E-Tele): August 9th #NeymarChallenge and My Wardrobe

Eテレ『世界へ発信!SNS英語術』8月9日放送分 #NeymarChallengeと当日の衣裳について



Official website of the show : https://www.nhk.or.jp/snsenglish/sns/s180809.html
番組HPへ https://www.nhk.or.jp/snsenglish/sns/s180809.html

■Behind the Scenes

On this episode we talked about #NeymarChallenge and other internet challenges.

Perhaps the most famous internet challenge is the #IceBucketChallenge, which went viral around mid-2014. The purpose of the challenge was to raise awareness of ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) and encourage donations to research; those who were challenged had to either post a video of themselves getting a bucket of ice water poured over their heads, or donate 100 dollars, then nominate three more people to take the challenge. Once celebrities started to join in on the challenge, it spread quickly and became a global phenomenon. In this way, internet challenges often involve posting something to social media to serve as the seed for spreading social awareness of an issue, and challenging other social media users to participate.

Of course, not all challenges are so for social causes. Many challenges are about clowning around, pure and simple. Case in point, #NeymarChallenge, an internet meme where participants posts videos of people falling to the ground and holding their knee in an exaggerated display, as if they were injured—just like the Brazilian soccer player himself when he is lightly pulled or is grazed by an opponent.
*An internet meme is an action, picture, video, or other media that is spread from person to person over the internet.
*A meme refers to the traditions, customs, common sense, knowledge, and behaviors that form the basis of human culture, and which are transferred from person to person through conversation or other means.

Another one is the mannequin challenge, which went viral in 2016. The challenge involved posting video of everybody in a certain location completely remaining still, as if they were a mannequin. The challenge quickly spread worldwide, and even Hillary Clinton made a video with her staff inside her campaign plane that was posted to social media the day before the election.

In this episode of our show we also attempted a number of new things. For the latter half of the episode we had our MC Kato-san’s first interview in English, where she got to meet Henry Cavill from the film Mission: Impossible – Fallout. So going with that theme our intro sequence for this episode was done in Mission: Impossible montage style. As a massive fan of the series, when I heard the beginning notes of that iconic theme, I got goosebumps.

We also tried our take on the sequences where Tom Cruise is given his mission from the IMF. Naito-sensei started the episode as a disembodied voice, giving Kato-san and sidekick Hide-san their mission—to learn English. Unfortunately, with our show being taped inside a studio, we were unable to do anything fancy like the “this tape will self-destruct in five seconds” bit, but Naito-sensei seemed to be enjoying himself throughout. Naito-sensei, mission accomplished!

■楽屋オチ

#NeymarChallengeを始め、様々なインターネット・チャレンジを今回は取り上げました。

インターネット・チャレンジといえば、2014年半ばに流行った#IceBucketChallengeが代表的ではないでしょうか。“筋萎縮性側索硬化症”という難病の認知度を高め、寄付を募るために、指名を受けた人が氷水をかぶる動画を投稿するか、1万円(100ドル)の寄付をするかを選び、次に3人を指名するという運動でした。多くのセレブが参加したことで、この運動は一気に拡散し、世界的に話題となりました。このように、特定の社会意識を高める為にネタを投稿し、他のSNS利用者に参加を促す“挑戦状”を出すことを、“インターネット・チャレンジ”と呼んでいます。

社会派なチャレンジ以外にも、純粋な“おふざけ”のチャレンジも色々とあります。今回の“ネイマール・チャレンジ”も、その一例で、ブラジル出身の世界的に有名なサッカー選手であるネイマールが行う、相手選手に軽く引っ張られたり少し触られただけで地面に転がり、まるで怪我をしたかのように膝などを抱える大袈裟なリアクションを、面白がってそれを真似した動画を投稿する人が、続出したことで生まれたインターネット・ミームです。

※インターネット・ミームとは、インターネットを通じて人から人へと広がっていく行動、または写真や動画などのメディアのことです。

※ミームとは、会話などを通して人から人へと伝わる情報であり、人類の文化を形成するための伝統や風習、慣習、常識、知識、振る舞いなどに類する、脳内の情報である 引用元:wikipediaより


他にも、2016年に流行った“マネキン・チャレンジ”もこの一例です。その場にいる全員が、マネキン人形のように静止した様子を撮影した動画は、瞬く間に世界中に広がり、ついにはアメリカ大統領選挙前日に、ヒラリー・クリントンまでもが選挙活動用の飛行機の中で、撮影したものを公開するということとなりました。

今回番組でも、様々な演出に“チャレンジ”しました。番組後半には、加藤さんが、映画『ミッション:インポッシブル』のヘンリー・カヴィルに行った英語インタヴューをオンエアすることとなっていたため、番組冒頭ではいつものオープニング映像ではなく、『ミッション:インポッシブル』風のモンタージュになっていました。僕はこの映画シリーズの大ファンなので、あの有名なテーマ曲が流れた瞬間、鳥肌が立ちました。

また、この映画シリーズ(日本では『スパイ大作戦』という放題で知られています)の冒頭に必ず行われる本部から指令を受けるシーンを真似して、内藤先生は、初めは声のみで登場し、加藤さんとヒデさんに英語を学ぶという“ミッション”を提示するという演出が行われました。残念ながら、スタジオ収録ということもあって、お決まりの「このテープは5秒後に自動的に消滅する」という部分は再現できませんでしたが、内藤先生は、こうした演出をとても楽しんでいたようで、終始ニコニコしていました。先生、お疲れ様でした。




■Motivating the Japanese vs. Motivating Americans

This may or may not be an urban legend, but I heard somewhere once that when Japanese convenience stores were having trouble with customers leaving their toilets in a bad state, they took down signs that said something to the effect of “keep clean” “do not make messy” and instead went with something more indirect: “Thank you for always using this toilet so cleanly.”

There’s something about this story that rings true. After all, the Japanese will say yoroshiku onegai shimasu (“I’m looking forward to our future dealings”) to someone they’ve just met. (This is one of the more difficult Japanese phrases to translate.) And they will say osewa ni narimasu (“thank you for everything in advance”) to someone they have just started a working relationship with. They use these sorts of “pillow words” to present themselves as humble and modest, but this behavior would never fly for a Westerner. From a Western perspective, it’s unclear whether these expressions are an embodiment of positivity and gratitude, or just a way to put indirect pressure on the recipient. Furthermore, it’s also unclear if the Japanese are moved to cooperate when there is a humble gesture, or if they are inclined to do someone a favor when that person butters them up. These questions remain, but setting them aside, from a behavioral psychology perspective, these are important things to understand in order to get along with Japanese people.

How then, can you motivate an American to action? The answer is to be aggressive. This has held true throughout American history, such as with the duel between Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr, or the provocative pose of Uncle Sam, or just the Wild West as a whole. That culture remains alive and well today. If an American (especially a man) is challenged to a duel, he cannot refuse. And it’s not just a simple matter of protecting one’s pride—when someone essentially says to you “I’d like to see you try”, you want to show them and shut them up.

※ The duel between Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr: when then Vice President Aaron Burr decided to run for New York State governor, his longtime rival in the courtroom and in politics Alexander Hamilton made a speech defaming Burr’s character, and in response Burr challenged him to a duel. Hamilton ended up being shot in the lower abdomen and died the following day; Burr’s political career effectively came to an end as a result of the duel.

The United States of America is a country that was founded on the frontier spirit. In that sense, an American without courage is seen as not an American at all. There is something in the sentiment that can be seen as similar to the Japanese code of the warrior—that if someone picks a fight with you, you must always take up the gauntlet. Side note, the spaghetti western classic A Fistful of Dollars is said to borrow liberally from Kurosawa Akira’s Yojimbo. (And further side note, the Japanese term for spaghetti westerns is “macaroni westerns”, coined by the film critic Yodogawa Nagaharu, who thought that spaghetti sounded too thin and frail.)

Taking into account the American disposition, it becomes evident why internet challenges are effective in spurring them to action. With Americans, it is more effective to present them with a difficult task or crisis than to implore them to act on their good nature. That being said, I’ve been to public restrooms in the U.S., and I’ve never see a sign reading “If you think you can leave this toilet in clean condition, I’d like to see you try.” But we do live in an age where apparently it’s become acceptable to record the racist words and actions of other people, post them online, and publicly shame them. In that sense, perhaps it would be effective to post a sign that simply read “#CleanBathroomChallenge”.

[Films that feature a key duel scene]
[決闘シーンがキーとなるオススメの映画]


『荒野の用心棒』セルジオ・レオーネ監督(1964年) 『夕陽のガンマン』セルジオ・レオーネ監督(1965年) 『続・夕陽のガンマン』セルジオ・レオーネ監督(1966年) 『バック・トゥ・ザ・フューチャー PART3』ロバート・ゼメキス監督(1990年)

■日本人の動かし方、アメリカ人の動かし方

スポーツには、それぞれのメディア特性があります。

日本の“コンビニ”(英語ではコンヴィニエンス・ストア)のトイレには、「綺麗に使って下さい」「汚すな」のような直接的な表現を使った張り紙を貼るのではなく、より婉曲で下から目線の「いつも綺麗にお使いいただき、ありがとうございます」という言い方に変えたところ、恐るべき効果を発揮したという都市伝説を聞いたことがあります。

この話には、合点が行くところがあります。何しろ日本人は、初めて会った時点から「よろしくお願いします」と挨拶します。(因みに、この表現ほど翻訳し難い日本語はありません。)お世話になる前から「お世話になります」という一種の“枕詞”のような謙虚な姿勢で臨むということは、西洋人には全く考えられない行動パターンです。をつけるのですから。西洋人からすると、この表現は、本質的には“前向きな喜びや感謝”を表しているのか、“間接的なプレッシャー”を与えようとしているのかが分かりにくいものなのです。また、日本人というものは、謙虚さを見せられると協力したい・・・と思うからなのか、それとも単にへいこらされると協力してあげたくなる・・・・・・・・からなのか、疑問が残ります。それはさておき、これは行動心理学の視点からすると、日本人とうまく付き合う上で、理解しなくてはならない大事なポイントであることは確かなことです。

一方で、アメリカ人を動かすには、どうしたらいいかと言えば、それは挑発的な態度を取ることではないでしょうか。アメリカにおいては、1804年の「アレクサンダー・ハミルトンとアーロン・バーの決闘」や、“アンクル・サム”の挑発的なポーズなどに代表される、西部開拓時代(いわゆる“ワイルド・ウェスト”)に完成された文化が今も尚、存在しています。アメリカ人(特に男性)は、決闘を申し込まれると、それを断ることは許されません。単純に、プライドが傷つきたくないということだけではなく、「できるものならやってみろ」と誰かに言われると、どうしてもその人を愕然とさせたいという心理が働くからなのです。

※「アレクサンダー・ハミルトンとアーロン・バーの決闘」とは、当時の副大統領であったアーロン・バーがニューヨーク州知事選に出馬したところ、法曹界に於いて、長年のライヴァルであったアレクサンダー・ハミルトンが、バーへの侮辱的な演説を行い、それに応じてバーは決闘を申し込んだという事件です。ハミルトンは下胸部に銃弾を受けて翌日死亡し、バーはこの結果によって、事実上政治生命を終らせることとなりました。

そもそもアメリカ合州国は、“フロンティア・スピリッツ”によって開拓された国であり、そういう意味で度胸のないアメリカ人はアメリカ人ではないと見なされます。「売られた喧嘩は買わねばならぬ」という“武士の掟”にも通ずるところがあるようにも思われます。因みに、スパゲッティ・ウェスタン(日本語では“マカロニ・ウェスタン”と言います。映画評論家の淀川長治が「スパゲッティでは細くて貧弱そうだ」という理由で呼び変えたらしいです。)の傑作とされる『荒野の用心棒』は、黒澤明の『用心棒』の“パクリ”とされています。

アメリカ人というものは、このような国民性を持っているので、この日紹介したようなインターネット・チャレンジというものが、アメリカ人を動かすためには、効果的なのです。アメリカ人の場合、良心に訴えるより、難題や難局を相手に突きつける方が効果的なのです。とはいえ、アメリカにおいて、「このトイレを綺麗に使えるものなら、使ってみせろ」といった張り紙は、今まで見たことありませんが。他人の人種差別的な発言や行動をスマホで録画し、それをネットで配信して公の辱めを受けさせるこのが一般的になった現在においては、単純に#CleanBathroomChallengeと書かれた張り紙を置くことの方がより効果的なのかもしれません。



■This Week’s Wardrobe/ 今週の衣裳

■Trying to pull off resort wear


Photo : ©Mikio Koyama / RendezVous
Since this show started, I’ve challenged myself to expand my style vocabulary and wear the kind of fashions ~~~ like colorful socks and summer jackets. And if it’s gone well, it’s mostly because I haven’t tried to do too much at once. I incorporated new elements one at a time—if I was doing something new with my socks, then socks were it for that outfit. In that way I slowly learned to wear and pull off new styles. (I hope.)

Around July, Scarlet suggested that I try out resort wear—specifically an “aloha” shirt, linen shorts, and bangle. Up until now I’ve never been the type of guy to wear accessories—bracelets, bangles, etc.—but I took a leap of faith and bought a shin silver bangle from Tiffany’s (42,120 yen tax incl.) These days you usually see wider bangles or leather bracelets, but I’m not enough of a rock star to pull off a wide bangle, and as the summers here can get very sweaty, Scarlet advised me to stay away from the leather ones.

According to Scarlet, the key to resort wear is to go without a wristwatch. Her reasoning is that people go to resorts to get away from father time. So this past summer, I wore my resort wear to several of the script meetings we had for the show, and lo and behold, I found myself having an easier time coming up with ideas. Up until now I would check my watch often and put myself in the mindset of time closing in on me, but with this outfit, each time I’d look down at my wrist, time would not be staring me in the face. It was liberating, and made me feel at ease. When wearing resort wear, it’s also a good idea to look at your smartphone as little as possible.

■リゾート・スタイルに“チャレンジ”

番組が始まって以来、カラー・ソックスやサマー・ジャケットなど、僕としては、初めてカラフル・・・・なファッションに色々と・・・“チャレンジ”してきました。これらの挑戦がこれまでうまく行ったと思えるのは、複数の要素を同時に取り込もうとするのではなく、ソックスならソックスだけという具合に、1つずつチャレンジしてきたからだと思います。そうすることで、少しずつ、新しいスタイルを着こなせるようになってきました。(多分。)

今年の7月頃に、アロハ・シャツとリネンの半ズボンにバングルを合わせる “リゾート・スタイル”に“チャレンジ”してみるよう、Scarletにすすめられました。これまでブレスレットやバングルなどのアクセサリー類は一度もつけたことがなかったのですが、思い切って「ティファニー」の細めのシルヴァー・バングル(税込42,120円)を購入しました。巷では太めのバングルやレザーのブレスレットをしている人をよく見かけますが、僕は太めのバングルをするほど“ロック”な人間ではないことと、夏は、とにかく汗をかくので、レザーのものはやめた方がいいとScarletに言われました。

Scarlet曰く“リゾート・スタイル”の1つのポイントは、腕時計をしないことだそうです。それはリゾートに泊まる目的は、時間を忘れてることだからです。今年の夏は、この“リゾート・スタイル”で番組の編集会議に何度か臨んでみましたが、いつも以上に気楽に、様々なアイディアが思い浮かんできたような気がします。これまでの打ち合わせの際には、ついつい時計を見てしまい、時間に追われている感覚になってしまいがちでしたが、腕元をチラッと見るたびにそこには腕時計がないことで、逆に、心に余裕が生まれてくる感覚になりました。こうしたスタイルの時には、なるべくスマホも見ないように心がけた方が、良いでしょう。



■Azabu Tailor off-white double-breasted jacket
「麻布テーラー」のオフホワイトのダブル・ブレスト・ジャケット


Photo : ©RendezVous
Check out WARDROBE & ENSEMBLES #018 for more information about this item.

こちらの商品は、以前紹介したのでWARDROBE & ENSEMBLES #018を参照してください


■Azabu Tailor white linen shirt
「麻布テーラー」の白いリネン・シャツ


Photo : ©RendezVous
Check out WARDROBE & ENSEMBLES #017 for more information about this item.

こちらの商品は、以前紹介したのでWARDROBE & ENSEMBLES #017を参照してください


■Brooks Brothers orange chinos
「ブルックス・ブラザーズ」のオレンジ色のチノパン


Photo : ©RendezVous
Check out WARDROBE & ENSEMBLES #020 for more information about this item.

こちらの商品は、以前紹介したのでWARDROBE & ENSEMBLES #020を参照してください




■Timberland slip-ons /「ティンバーランド」の茶色いスリップ・オン


Photo : ©RendezVous
Check out WARDROBE & ENSEMBLES #020 for more information about this item.

こちらの商品は、以前紹介したのでWARDROBE & ENSEMBLES #020を参照してください


■Zoff brown glasses / 「ゾフ」の茶色いメガネ


Photo : ©RendezVous
Check out WARDROBE & ENSEMBLES #003 for more information about this item.

こちらの商品は、以前紹介したのでWARDROBE & ENSEMBLES #003 を参照してください。



■Something I’d Like to Challenge

The Japanese usually use the English loanword charenji (challenge) to mean “try to...” or “do one’s best at...”. It’s common in Japanese to say 〜にチャレンジする (literally, I will challenge... ) But challenge is not used this way in standard English.

As a result, when Japanese people try to use the word challenge in English conversation, they will say something like this:

I want to challenge this job.

This sentence, however, does not mean that you’ll do your best at this job, but that you have a problem with it, and would like to raise an issue with someone about it. In English you would say something like this:
I want to do my best at this job.
(この仕事で最善を尽くしたい)

I want to try to do my best at this job.
(この仕事で最善を尽くせるよう、頑張りたい)

I want to give this job a shot.
(この仕事に挑戦してみたい)

How is challenge used in English? One key difference is that a challenge is often not something you do but something that someone else imposes on you (or that you impose on yourself). As a verb it is used thusly:

I challenge you to learn one new English word every day.
(毎日新たらしい英単語を1つ学ぶようにあなたに課題を出します)

She should challenge herself more.
(彼女は、もっと自分に課題を課すべきだ)

I challenged myself to go one week without meat.
(私は1週間、肉を食べずに過ごすよう、自分に課題を課した)

Of course, there are instances where a challenge is something you do :

challenge someone to a fight
((誰か)に戦いを挑む)

challenge someone’s assertion
(誰かの主張に異議を申し立てる)

challenge someone to realize their dream
(夢を実現しようとしている(誰か)の意欲をかき立てる)

challenge a line call
( (テニス選手がアンパイアの)ライン・コールに異議を申し立てる)

Basically, all of this is to say that I’d like to challenge the use of charenji in Japanese.

Speaking of challenging something, these days I often hear Japanese people using the word “objection”.

When used in an American court of law, an objection is a formal protest raised during trial, specifically when a witness is being asked a question. The judge then decides whether the objection is sustained, in which case the person doing the questioning has to ask a different question, or overruled, in which case the witness has to answer. In a more general sense, to object to something means to be opposed to it, or to not allow it. In both uses it is a strong expression of disapproval, and it always feels a little off when a usually reserved Japanese person uses this term without warning and without fully understanding its meaning.

So what is the difference between to object and to challenge? While to object to something is to clearly voice your opposition to it, to challenge something means to voice your doubt as to the validity or accuracy of something, to suggest that it be looked at again. In other words, while the former is a unilateral expression of your thoughts or feelings, the latter is an effort to improve a situation or to right a potential wrong. In that regard, Japanese society has plenty of people who like to object, but perhaps too few people who like to challenge.

■僕が“チャレンジ”したいこと

日本語では、よく「〜をやってみる」「〜に挑む」という意味で、「何かにチャレンジする」という言い方をします。しかし、こういう使い方は英語の“challenge”の使い方と少し違います。英語で「〜に挑む」は “try to...”や“do one’s best at...”という言い方が一般的です。

例えば日本語的な感覚で“challenge”を使って英文を作ろうとすると、

I want to challenge this job.

というような言い方をするのではないでしょうか。しかし、この文章は「この仕事に挑みたい」ではなく、「この仕事に異議を申し立てたい」という意味になってしまいます。英語では次のような言い方をします:

I want to do my best at this job.
(この仕事で最善を尽くしたい)

I want to try to do my best at this job.
(この仕事で最善を尽くせるよう、頑張りたい)

I want to give this job a shot.
(この仕事に挑戦してみたい)

では、英語の“challenge”はどのように使うのでしょうか。英語的には多くの場合、“challenge” は自分が「する」ことではなく、外部、他人、世の中、もしくは自分が自分に「課す」ものなのです。例えば、動詞としては次のような使い方をします:

I challenge you to learn one new English word every day.
(毎日新たらしい英単語を1つ学ぶようにあなたに課題を出します)

She should challenge herself more.
(彼女は、もっと自分に課題を課すべきだ)

I challenged myself to go one week without meat.
(私は1週間、肉を食べずに過ごすよう、自分に課題を課した)

ただ、自分から“challenge”をすることもあります。その場合は、 “challenge+代名詞”という形をとることが多いです。例えば、

challenge someone to a fight
((誰か)に戦いを挑む)

challenge someone’s assertion
(誰かの主張に異議を申し立てる)

challenge someone to realize their dream
(夢を実現しようとしている(誰か)の意欲をかき立てる)

challenge a line call
((テニス選手がアンパイアの)ライン・コールに異議を申し立てる)

つまり、僕は日本人の「チャレンジ」の使い方に、“チャレンジ”したい(異議を唱えたい)のです。

「異議」といえば、最近日本人でもよく使っているのを耳にするのは、“オブジェクション”という表現です。

アメリカの法廷における“オブジェクション”という名詞は、尋問者が証人に向けた質問に対して相手側が「異議あり」ということです。裁判官は“sustained”と言い、その異議を認めた場合は、尋問者は別の質問を聞かないといけなくなります。“overruled”と言って認めない場合は、証人はその質問に答える必要があります。また、一般的な“object”という動詞には「反対する」「(ある言動を)許さない」という広い意味を持ちます。かなり強い反対意思を表現しているため、謙虚なイメージの日本人が本当の用法を知らずに使っているところを見ると、不思議な感じがします。 

“object”と“challenge”はどう違うのかといいますと、“object”は明確に「反対する」という意味であるのに対して、“challenge”は「違うのではないかと訴える」「正確性・的確性を疑う」というニュアンスであることです。前者は自分の思いをぶつけようとしている一方的な表現なのですが、後者は状態をより良くしようとする、より正しくしようとする意志があるということです。そういう意味では、日本社会では現在、“object”する人は多いですが、“challenge”する人は少ないのかもしれません。


Copyright RendezVous