2018/10/15   #006
Meditations on the Tokyo Night Club Scene
東京のナイト・クラブについての一考察

Today I’d like to finish with an interview with BigBrother about Tokyo’s nightclub scene. His credentials are impressive, to wit:

In the 1970s, BigBrother—from the time he was in grade school—would find himself accompanying adults to Akasaka establishments like the go-go club Mugen, and nightclubs like New Latin Quarter and Copacabana.

In the 80s, night after night he would go to discotheques like Xenon, New York New York, and Tsubaki House in Shinjuku, as well as the disco venues in Roppongi Square Building.

In the 90s, he could frequently be spotted at clubs like Gold and Juliana's in Shibaura, and Velfarre and Yellow in Roppongi.

In the 00s, he was involved in organizing numerous raves.

今回は、BigBrotherに東京のナイトクラブ・シーンについてインタビュー形式で伺いました。まずは大まかにBigBrotherのクラブ歴について:

1970年代、BigBrotherは、黒人の生バンドがR&Bを生演奏していた赤坂の“ゴーゴー・クラブ”『ムゲン』や『ニュー・ラテンクオーダー』『コパカバーナ』というナイト・クラブに小学生の頃から連れて行かれ、

80年代には、新宿の『ゼノン』『ニューヨーク・ニューヨーク』『ツバキ・ハウス』、六本木のスクエアビルのディスコに夜な夜な通い、90年代には、芝浦の『GOLD』『ジュリアナ』、六本木の『ヴェルファーレ』『YELLOW』に出没し、00年代には、数々のレイヴに携わりました。



■The 70s: Dewi Sukarno and Copacabana

KAZOO: I’d like to begin with nightclubs in the 70s. What kind of places were they?

BigBrother: At the time, nightclubs could be divided into one of two types. You had “grand cabaret clubs”—clubs like New Latin Quarter or Copacabana, where hostesses attended to customers and famous singers and musicians would perform live. Dewi Fujin (socialite Dewi Sukarno) worked at the later. The other was go-go clubs, a style of venue that would later become discos and nightclubs. Mugen in Akasaka was an especially popular go-go club. They had black musicians playing R&B music live. Grand cabaret clubs were frequented by the rich, politicians, baseball players, and the like. Go-go clubs were places where young people from the fashion industry and mass media congregated.

KAZOO: Tell me about the disco craze in the 80s. What was that like?

BigBrother: Nightclubs in the 70s were the playground of Tokyo’s fashionable—the few who were ahead of the trend. Then in the 80s, dance music became a thing of the masses. By that I mean what came to be called the disco style. You paid a 3,000 to 5,000 yen cover charge, and you got free drinks and free food.

KAZOO: They gave you food?

BigBrother: Nothing to write home about, of course. It was just the style at the time.

KAZOO: I read something on the internet about Shinjuku-types and Roppongi-types.

BigBrother: In the 80s, there were somewhere around 20 to 30 discos of various sizes in both Shinjuku and Roppongi. Shinjuku discos were mostly large-size venues that were pickup spots and mid-size venues that catered to the artsy type. In Roppongi there were many mid-size venues that catered to the surfer crowd.


■デヴィ夫人が在籍していた70年代の「コパカパーナ」

KAZOO:まずは、70年代のナイト・クラブと呼ばれるところは、どんな感じだったのか教えてください。

BigBrother:当時、ナイト・クラブは、大きく2つに分けられていました。1つは、『ニュー・ラテン・クオーター』やデヴィ夫人が在籍していたことでも知られている『コパカパーナ』などのホステスさんが接客し、有名な歌手やミュージシャンのショーが行われる“グランド・キャバレー”という形式のものです。そして、もう1つが“ゴーゴー・クラブ”とよばれるディスコ/クラブの原型となるスタイルのものです。“ゴーゴー・クラブ”の中で人気だったのが、赤坂にあった『ムゲン』という店です。そこでは、黒人のミュージシャンがR&Bを生で演奏していました。前者の“グランド・キャバレー”には、お金持ち、政治家、野球選手らが出入りし、後者の“ゴーゴー・クラブ”には、ファッション業界、マスコミ業界の若い人々が集まっていました。

KAZOO:80年代のディスコブームは、どんな感じだったのでしょうか。

BigBrother:70年代のナイト・クラブは、東京のごく一部の流行の先端を行っている人たちの娯楽でありました。80年代に入り、ダンス・ミュージックというものが一気に大衆化しました。いわゆる“ディスコ”とよばれるスタイルになり、入場料¥3,000〜¥5,000を支払うと、フリードリンク+フリーフードというシステムになります。

KAZOO:食べ物もあったんですか?

BigBrother:決して、美味しくはないんですけど、それが当時のスタイルだったんです。

KAZOO:ネットで調べると、新宿派と六本木派みたいなものがあったようなんですが。

BigBrother:80年代には、新宿にも六本木にも大小合わせて各々20〜30とかのディスコがありました。新宿には、主に“ナンパ系の大バコ”とデザイン・ファッション系の“アート系の中バコ”がありました。六本木には、“サーファー系の中バコ”が数多く存在していました。



■The 80s: Shinjuku Discotheques and “Land Surfers”

KAZOO: What were the distinguishing features of each of those types?

BigBrother: Places like Xenon and New York New York in Shinjuku were large-size venues and popular pickup spots. They played disco hits that were lighting up the American Top 40, and there would be synchronized choreography that everybody knew. Perhaps you could say that formed the roots of the Para Para craze in the aughts.

KAZOO: I’ve noticed Japanese people really love synchronized dancing. I’m thinking of the Bon festival dance and radio calisthenics.

BigBrother: It’s something unique to East Asia, I think. Look at contemporary K-pop. Look at mass gymnastics in North Korea. It’s the same sort of thing.

KAZOO: What about the other types of discos?

BigBrother: Tsubaki House in Shinjuku was a type of mid-size disco that catered to artsy types. Those were very popular. They were frequented by what were called “house mannequins”—female sales assistants—who worked at designer brand boutiques, and the unique characters into fashion and design who wanted to be like them. The sound was mostly U.K. music, like new wave and techno, and once in a while, London punk.

KAZOO: I imagine that part of the scene led to Pithecanthropus Erectus in Harajuku, where the band YMO was formed.

BigBrother: The 80s was also when major apparel manufacturers—like JUN, ROPÉ, and COMME ÇA DU MODE—and designers like Koshino Junko, Miyake Issei, Yamamoto Yohji, and Kawakubo Rei (COMME des GARÇONS) became big. Young people donned their fashions and flocked to Tsubaki House and Pithecanthropus Erectus.

KAZOO: I’m beginning to see why YMO wore the type of clothes they did, and why they wore their hair in a “techno cut”. What about the surfer-oriented discos in Roppongi—what were they like?

BigBrother: Roppongi types could also be divided into two groups: surfer-types and maharaja-types. Surfer-types were chiefly Edokko (born and raised in Tokyo) pleasure-seekers, whereas marahaja-types were chiefly people from the suburbs who aspired to that pleasure-seeking lifestyle. Real surfers went to surfer-oriented discos, while land-based surfers went to a disco called Maharaja.

KAZOO: What do you mean by land-based surfer?

BigBrother: There was a whole demographic of guys at the time who would have a surfboard mounted on their car but couldn’t actually surf. And they had the most unnatural tans.

KAZOO: Japanese people are great at that kind of superficial posing.

BigBrother: The key point here is that at the time, people drew a distinction between Tokyo-mono (people from the city) and inaka-mono (country bumpkins), even moreso than today. The discos in Shinjuku—whether you’re talking about the pickup spots or the artsy venues—were places where inaka-mono, who aspired to Tokyo, congregated. And Maharaja in Roppongi also basically catered to inaka-mono as well. It’s important to remember that YMO were able to attain the success they did partly thanks to this social framework. Sakamoto Ryuichi, Hosono Haruomi, and Takahashi Yukihiro are all obocchan (well-to-do prep school-types) from Tokyo. And YMO was lifted up by people like Kuwahara Moichi, who was from Okayama Prefecture, and Fujiwara Hiroshi, who was from Mie Prefecture. To this day, this dynamic can be seen in many areas of society.

■80年代の新宿のディスコティックと陸サーファー

KAZOO:それぞれどんな特徴があったんですか。

BigBrother:新宿の『ゼノン』や『ニューヨーク・ニューヨーク』といった“ナンパ系の大バコ”は、アメリカのTOP40で流行していたディスコ・ナンバーが流れ、“フリ”つきで皆が同じ踊りをしていました。ある意味、ゼロ年代に流行する“パラパラ”のルーツなのかもしれません。

KAZOO:日本人は、全員で同じ踊りをするのが好きなのですね。“盆踊り”や“ラジオ体操”みたいに。

BigBrother:きっと東アジアの特徴でしょうか、現在のK-POPや北朝鮮の“マスゲーム”を見ても、それは言えますからね。

KAZOO:その他のディスコの特徴も教えてください。

BigBrother:新宿の『ツバキ・ハウス』など“アート系の中バコ”は、当時大流行していました。“デザイナーズ・ブランド”の“ハウス・マヌカン”とよばれる店員やそれを目指すファッション/デザインに興味のある、個性派の人々が集まっていました。“ニューウェイヴ”や“テクノ”、日によっては、“ロンドン・パンク”などのイギリス系のサウンドがかかっていました。

KAZOO:YMOが結成の話がなされたとされる原宿のピテカントロプス・エレクトスとかに繋がる感じですね。

BigBrother:80年代は、『JUN』、『ROPÉ』『コムサ・デ・モード』などの大手アパレルや『コシノ・ジュンコ』、『三宅一生』、『山本耀司』『コム・デ・ギャルソン(川久保玲)』などのデザイナーがとても人気を集めました。彼らのファッションをまとった若者たちが、『ツバキ・ハウス』や『ピテカントロプス・エレクトス』に集まっていたわけです。

KAZOO:YMOのファッションやあの“テクノカット”の意味がわかったような気がします。六本木の“サーファー系”のディスコは、どんな感じだったのですか。

BigBrother:六本木も “サーファー系”と“マハラジャ系”に分けられると思います。“サーファー系”は、東京に生まれ育った“江戸っ子”の遊び人が中心で、“マハラジャ系”は、それに憧れる、東京近郊の人が多く集まっていました。“サーファー系”ディスコには、本当のサーファーが来ていて、“マハラジャ”には、“陸サーファー”が集まるっていうか。

KAZOO:“陸サーファー”って何ですか?

Big Brother:本当は、サーフィンができないのに、サーフボードだけを車に積んでいて、不自然なまでに日焼けをしている人々たちが、当時は、沢山いたんだ。

KAZOO:日本人は、表面だけマネをするのは、得意ですからね。

Big Brother:ここで、注目すべきことは、当時は、今以上に“東京者”と“田舎者”の区別が厳しかったということです。新宿のディスコは、“ナンパ系”であれ“アート系”であれ、東京に憧れる“田舎者”の集団であったし、六本木の“マハラジャ系”の人々も基本的に“田舎者”なわけですよ。YMOの成功の秘密もその構造があることを忘れてはいけないんです。坂本龍一も細野晴臣も高橋幸宏もみんな“東京のお坊ちゃん”なんですよ。彼らに憧れる岡山県出身の桑原茂一や三重県出身の藤原ヒロシらがYMOを持ち上げるといった構造がそこにあるんです。このスタイルが現在まで色々なシーンで続いているんです。




■The 90s: Nightclubs and Hip Hop Music

KAZOO: How did the nightclub scene change as Japan entered the 90s?

BigBrother: Economy-wise, the bubble burst around ’91 to ’93, but I feel like the market for nightlife only became bigger as we entered the 90s.

KAZOO: When they talk about the bubble era on TV they always use footage from Juliana’s Tokyo, but that club actually opened in ’91—the year they say the bubble collapsed.

BigBrother: That’s right. Gold (operated between 1989-1995) opened in Shibaura in ’89, and Juliana’s Tokyo (operated between 1991-1994) opened in ’91.

KAZOO: What was Gold like? What was Juliana’s Tokyo like?

BigBrother: Think of it as taking the upbeat nature of pickup spots in Shinjuku and the maharaja-types in Roppongi, and adding on top of that house music and Eurobeat—which were just becoming big. Gold played house music, and Juliana’s had a sound similar to Eurobeat, which would form the basis for Avex. Up until then, DJs had just been another member of the staff attending to the floor, but it was around that time that they started entering the limelight.

KAZOO: I hear that DJs like EMMA and Kimura Ko were DJs at Gold.

BigBrother: Yes, that’s right. Both of them were very popular DJs. The nightclub scene in New York was also big at the time, and in Japan the scene was starting to shift from discos to the clubs we know today. In ’91, Space Lab Yellow opened in Nishi-Azabu, and in ’93 Maniac Love opened in Aoyama. The former focused on house music, and the latter on techno.

KAZOO: Sounds like a fun time to be a club-goer.

BigBrother:It was at during that time that dance music started to branch out into subgenres. In ’95, a then-unknown but now legendary rock band performed at a new rock music club called Milk in Ebisu.

KAZOO: What happened to the meet market-type clubs?

BigBrother: in ’94 Avex Group opened a club called Velfarre in Roppongi. People who had been displaced by the closing of Gold and Maharaja had found their new haunt.

KAZOO: What about the hip-hop club scene?

BigBrother: Harlem opened in ’97 along the so-called Rambling Street. Coupled with Manhattan Records, which had opened in ’91, Shibuya became synonymous with hip-hop for a while there.

■90年代のクラブとHIP HOP

KAZOO:それが90年代に入り、どのようにナイトクラブ・シーンは、変化していくのですか?

BigBrother:経済的には、91〜93年にバブルは崩れるのですが、“夜の街”は、むしろ90年代に入り、より大きなマーケットになっていった気がします。

KAZOO:よく資料映像で、バブルの象徴として使われる“ジュリアナ東京”は、実はバブル崩壊の年と言われる91年にオープンしているんですよね。

BigBrother:そうなんですよ、芝浦の『GOLD』(89−95)は、89年のオープンだし、『ジュリアナ東京』(91−94)は、91年のオープンなんです。

KAZOO:『GOLD』と『ジュリアナ東京』はどんな感じだったんですか。

BigBrother:新宿の“ナンパ系”ディスコと六本木の“マハラジャ系”のノリに、当時の人気の出始めたハウスやユーロビートが加わった感じです。『GOLD』は、ハウス系で、“ジュリアナ”は、avexの源流となるユーロビート寄りなサウンドでしたね。これまでフロア・スタッフの一員でしかなかったDJという職業が、脚光を浴び始めた時代です。

KAZOO:今でもDJとして活動しているEMMAとかKIMURA KOとかも『GOLD』のDJだったんですよね。

BigBrother:そうそう彼らは、当時からとても人気のあるDJでした。この時代、NYでもナイト・クラブが大人気で、日本でも“ディスコ”の時代から、“クラブ”の時代へシフトしはじめたんです。91年には西麻布の『スペース・ラボ・イエロー』が、93年には青山の『マニアック・ラブ』がオープンしました。イエローはハウス系で、マニアック・ラブはテクノ系という感じで。

KAZOO:楽しそうな時代ですね。

BigBrother:ダンス・ミュージックのジャンルが、世界的に細分化されていった時代だね。95年には、まだ無名だった伝説的ロックバンドが演奏したという恵比寿の『みるく』というロック・クラブもオープンしました。

KAZOO:“ナンパ系”の流れはどうなんたんですか。

BigBrother:94年に六本木にavexグループが『ヴェルファーレ』をオープンさせ、ゴールド、マハラジャの閉鎖後、行き場を失ってた人々の人気を集めました。

KAZOO:HIP HOP系のクラブシーンは、どうだったのですか。

Big Brother:97年に通称“ランブリング・ストリート”にハーレムがオープンし、91年にオープンした『マンハッタン・レコード』と共に、渋谷イコールHIP HOPみたいな空気になっていたね。



■The 00s: Rave Culture and Drugs

KAZOO: BigBrother, I’ve often heard you talk about how the club scene around the turn of the millennium had the most fun things going on. Tell me more about that.

BigBrother: Dance music genres became more segmented, and more clubs and DJs with off-center tastes started popping up on the scene. You had more options as a club-goer. And you also had rave culture being imported, so the scene was undergoing big changes.

KAZOO: I’ve researched that in the past, so if I may...in the late 80s you had what was called the Second Summer of Love, a dance music movement that erupted in the U.K., which drew inspiration from the Summer of Love in 1967—where hippies converged in San Francisco and in other cities across the U.S.

Anyway, this movement actually began on the island of Ibiza in the Mediterrenean Sea, which was famous for its resorts. In many ways that’s where dance music culture was cultivated—and that culture was then brought back to the U.K. And that movement kept growing into the 90s.

People started dragging their sound equipment outdoors and hosting what were called rave parties—free outdoor dance parties. The parties became bigger and bigger, and noise pollution, littering, and drug use became serious social issues. As a result, the U.K. Parliament passed the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act in 1994, which imposed restrictions on outdoor rave parties.

But globally speaking, the movement took on a mind of its own. The dance music festival Love Parade, which for a long time was held annually in Berlin, kept growing in size, and drew a record crowd of 1.5 million in 1999.

Up until that point, dance music like house and techno was the underground sound worshipped by a certain segment of young people. But it was slowly becoming mainstream.

In the late 90s, you had genres like big beat and digital rock that fused rock and dance music, and musicians like Underworld, Fatboy Slim, and The Chemical Brothers were hugely successful international acts.

This movement would eventually make its way to Japan. You had guerilla gigs—free raves, essentially, happening in places like Yoyogi Park and on the Shonan coast. Fuji Rock Festival, which was first held in ’97, also came out of this movement. The highlight might have been when the headlining Red Hot Chili Peppers played in the rain, but the fact that acts like Aphex Twin, Massive Attack, and The Prodigy were included in the lineup speaks volumes.

BigBrother: Also, let’s not forget how that movement was intimately connected with the ecstasy (MDMA) epidemic. Despite the fact that ecstasy was illegal, it came in the form of these colorful tablets, and people were using them like they were supplements, or vitamins. Around the world, abuse of the drug increased, even among minors and women.

KAZOO: The drug became a social issue in America at the time as well. What was the relationship between MDMA and dance music?

BigBrother: Take trance music, for example, which became really popular starting the late 90s. In some ways you might even say the genre evolved to be the perfect complement to an MDMA high.

KAZOO: In America, when you think of trance, you think of DJs like Tiesto, or Ferry Corsten, or Armin Van Buuren, who play a kind of melodic, spaced-out trance. In Japan, it seems that psychedelic trance was especially big.

BigBrother: Right, there’s the kind of trance played by the DJs you just listed, and the psychedelic trance that has its roots in Israel, Turkey, and India. Regarding the former, Avex rebranded it as “cyber trance”, and it took the meet market type of clubs and discos by storm. And its cyber trance that gave birth to the Para Para dance craze. Meanwhile, at the raves being hosted in the mountains and by the oceans in Japan, the music being blasted was mostly psychedelic trance.

Psychedelic trance evolved out of Goa trance, which originated in the hippie haven of Goa, India. The genre was championed by sound creators like Hallucinogen, Juno Reactor, and Infected Mushroom.

■00年代のレイヴとドラッグ

KAZOO:BigBrotherはよく、2000年前後のシーンが一番面白かったということをお話しになりますが、それはどうしてなのでしょうか。

Big Brother:ダンス・ミュージックのジャンルが細分化され、より趣味の偏ったクラブやDJが出現し、選択肢が広がり、海外からは、“レイヴ”カルチャーが入り始めてきたことで、シーンが大きく変化したからだね。

KAZOO:その周りのことは、以前調べたことがあるので、僕に説明させてください。80年代後半にイギリスで起こったダンス・ミュージック・ムーブメントを『セカンド・サマー・オブ・ラブ』といいますが、これは1967年にアメリカのサンフランシスコを中心に各地でヒッピーが集まった『サマー・オブ・ラブ』に由来します。

この流れの元となったのが、地中海のリゾート地の1つであるイビサ島で、ダンス・ミュージックという文化が発達し、その影響が、イギリスにも及び、90年代に更に大きくなります。

音響機材を屋外に持ち出し、フリーのダンス・パーティーいわゆる“レイヴ・パーティー”を開くようになります。その規模は次第に大きくなり、騒音やゴミや薬物乱用などが社会問題化します。その結果、イギリスにおいて、“クリミナル・ジャスティス・ビル”が成立して、“レイヴ・パーティー”が規制される事態となりました。

しかし、この流れは、世界的には止まらなくなり、ドイツのベルリンでは、99年に150万人を動員する“ラブ・パレード”というとても大きなイヴェントにまで成長します。

これまで、一部の若者の“アンダー・グラウンド”な音楽であったハウスやテクノといったダンス・ミュージックがメインストリームの音楽ジャンルになっていきます。

90年代後半には、『アンダー・ワールド』『ファットボー・イスリム』『ケミカル・ブラザーズ』などロックとダンス・ミュージックが融合した“ビック・ビート”“デジタル・ロック”と呼ばれるジャンルのミュージシャンが世界的な成功を収めます。

日本にもこの流れは、押し寄せ、代々木公園や湘南海岸などでも、フリー・レイヴがゲリラ的に行われます。フジ・ロックフェスティバルもこうしたムーブメントの中で、97年に第1回が開催されます。“レッチリ”の雨の中での演奏がとても有名ですが、『エイフェックス・ツイン』『マッシヴアタック』『プロディジー』などのデジタル・ロック系のバンドがラインナップされることでもその影響力の大きさがわかります。

BigBrother:ここで忘れてはいけないのが、このムーブメントが“エクスタシー(MDMA)”という違法薬物の大流行との関連だよね。エクスタシーは、禁止薬物にも関わらず、カラフルな錠剤になっていたりして、サプリメントやビタミンを取る感覚で使用されていたんだ。世界的に未成年や女性にも乱用者が増えたんだよね。

KAZOO:当時のアメリカでも社会問題化しました。MDMAは、ダンス・ミュージックにどのような影響を与えるんですか。

BigBrother:90年代後半から、人気が出始めた“トランス”と呼ばれるジャンルは、まさにMDMAで気持ち良くなるための音楽とさえ、言えるのかもしれないね。

KAZOO:アメリカで“トランス”というと『ティエスト』とか『フェリー・コーステン』、『アーミン・ヴァン・ブーレン』などのメロディアスでスペイシーな感じのDJが有名なのですが、日本では、“サイケデリック・トランス”が主流だったようですね。

BigBrother:確かに“トランス”には、西ヨーロッパを中心にした、KAZOOが指摘したようなDJによる“トランス”とイスラエル、トルコ、インドをルーツとする“サイケデリック・トランス”があるよね。前者を日本では、avexが“サイバー・トランス”と呼んで、“ナンパ系”のクラブ/ディスコで流行したんだ。この“サイバー・トランス”が、パラパラブームにつながるんだよね。一方、日本の山や海で行われるレイヴでは、主に“サイケデリック・トランス”が中心に演奏されていたんだ。

“サイケデリック・トランス”は、ヒッピーの聖地のインドのゴアのリゾートで“ゴア・トランス”として生まれたものが、発展したもので、“ハルシノゲン”“ジュノリアクター”“インフェクテッド・マッシュルーム”などが代表的なサウンド・クリエーターなんだよね。



■The 2010s: The Worldwide EDM Craze

KAZOO: These currents would reach a critical point in the aughts.

BigBrother: Even in Japan, you started having these massive outdoor raves like Metamorphose and Solstice Music Festival, which drew crowds in the millions. People who experienced just how fun it was to dance outdoors became dedicated “ravers”, and “clubbers” suddenly found themselves displaced; the rise of raves led to the closure of many long-established nightclubs.

KAZOO: But then that rave craze lost steam very quickly as we moved into the late aughts. Around 2008, just after I’d graduated from college and moved to Japan, it seemed to me that both the club scene and the rave scene were floundering. The only noteworthy nightclub was WOMB, and the only big dance music event worth mentioning was WIRE.

BigBrother: Drugs had started infesting Japan’s raves and nightclubs. There were even drug-related deaths. And the drugs were funding organized crime, so part of it was due to police crackdowns.

KAZOO: In the 2010s, EDM as a genre started taking off in America. Many of my friends were, should we say, stoked to go to dance music festivals like Ultra Music Festival and Electric Daisy Carnival every year.

BigBrother: It’s interesting—for the past 10 years, Japan’s been in a dance music winter. But elsewhere around the world, the EDM has become a huge movement.

■10年代の世界的なEDMブーム

KAZOO:こうした流れが、ゼロ年代に入り、大きくブレイクするのですね。

BigBrother:日本でも数万人規模の『メタモルフォーゼ』、『Solstice Music Festival』などの野外レイヴが行われるようになったんだ。一度、野外で踊る楽しさを知った“レイヴァー”は、“クラバー”を駆逐し、レイヴの出現によって老舗クラブの多くは、クローズされることになったんだよ。

KAZOO:その“レイヴ”ブームも日本では、ゼロ年代後半には、急速に失速しましたよね。僕が大学を卒業して東京で暮らしていた2008年には、クラブもレイヴもあまり盛り上がっていませんでした。クラブでいえば、WOMB、イヴェントでいえば、WIREぐらいしかありませんでした。

BigBrother:“レイヴ”や“クラブ”での薬物汚染が広がり、死者が出たり、反社会勢力の資金源になっていたりしたので、警察の取り締まりが強くなったこともあるよね。

KAZOO:2010年代になると、アメリカでも急速に“EDM”がメジャーになってきました。友人なんかも毎年、“Ultra Music Festival”“edc Electric Daisy Carnival”などのダンス・ミュージックのフェスに行くのを楽しみにしている人が増えてきました。

Big Brother:確かに日本では、この10年間、ダンス・ミュージックは、冬の時代に入っている感じだけれども、世界的には、“EDM”は、大きなムーブメントになっているよね。

KAZOO:アメリカには、ドラック・ミュージックだったものを商業化するようなタフな人達がいて、50年代には“JAZZ”を、70年代には“ROCK”を、80〜90年代には“HIP HOP”を、そしてゼロ〜10年代には、“EDM”をビジネスとして成功させてきました。



KAZOO: In America, there’s always a group of toughs looking to turn what was once drug music into something commercially viable. It happened with jazz in the 50s, rock in the 70s, hip-hop in the 80s and 90s, and now EDM in the aughts and 2010s. In each case they succeeded from a business perspective.

BigBrother: Regarding that last one, the Japanese had the chance to be the ones to take advantage of EDM’s business potential. Unfortunately, for the past 20 years the industry has only been churning out music for uncool otaku-types.

KAZOO: In the 2010s, the American music industry started pushing European producers like David Guetta, Calvin Harris, Avicii—R.I.P.—ZEDD, and Afrojack, as well as American producers like Steve Aoki and Skrillex. They made the genre viable from a business perspective.

BigBrother: And those producers make about two to four billion yen a year. There’s both a good side and a bad side to the fact that Americans tend to judge people by the amount of money they earn.

KAZOO: It’s the Protestant ethic. People with talent are expected to make commensurate financial gains, whether it’s in music, sports, or business. People respect those who have talent—those who put in the effort. People do whatever they can to help them out.

BigBrother: The Japanese, on the other hand, love to find people’s faults and drag them down to the bottom of the barrel.

KAZOO: Americans tend to focus on people’s strengths rather than their weaknesses. I suppose that partly explains why we could end up with a president like the one we have now.

BigBrother:日本人は、音楽ビジネスとしてのチャンスがあったのに、この20年間、“いけてないオタク”のための音楽しか提供してこなかったからね。

KAZOO:2010年代になって、アメリカの音楽業界は、ヨーロッパからデヴィット・ゲッター、カルヴィン・ハリス、アヴィーチ (安らかにお眠りください)、ZEDD、アフロジャック、国内からスティーヴ・アオキ、スクリレックスなどを発掘して、ビジネスとして成功させてきました。

BigBrother:彼らは、年間20〜40億ぐらい、稼ぐんだよね。アメリカ人のいいところでもあり、悪いところでもあるんだけど、人間の評価を、稼いだお金で測るところがあるよね。

KAZOO:才能のある人は、音楽であれ、スポーツであれ、ビジネスであれ、お金を稼ぐことが信仰の結果であるという“プロテスタンティズム”を持っていますからね。なので才能を持っている人や、努力している人を尊敬するし、助けようともします。

Big Brother:日本人は、人のちょっとした欠点を見つけて、足を引っ張るのが大好物だからね。

KAZOO:アメリカ人は、欠点よりも長所に注目します。だから、あのような大統領も選ばれてしまうのですが。